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green and gold Rolex

We all know that celebrities and the media do influence the secondary market. As a matter of fact, there were times when a member of the team was chasing a specific value proposition and begged an editor not to cover the replica watch until he had acquired it. This surge of interest occurred after the Daytona-fest of John Mayer’s Talking Watch Part II, where the singer inadvertently blew up the 2016 Daytona in gold and green dials overnight.
While the stunning steel Daytona is Rolex’s chronograph, in 2016 the brand also released new variations of their classic chronograph in white and yellow gold. Today, we take a look at the Reference 116508 in 18k yellow gold with a new green dial – a color combination that no Australian can resist.  gold Rolex Daytona
The 116508 is the same 40mm Oyster case, powered by the 4130 caliber and accurate to within -2/+2 per day. Actually, the only difference between this model and the earlier ones is the dial. But what a deal it is. The yellow gold version of the replica Rolex Daytona most often has a black or champagne-colored dial – the shine and richness of the green are amazing.
Of course, green is a special color for Rolex, but in this case, that green is not like the bright shades of the Green Submariner or the mossy green of the new Day-Date 40. It’s a rich color, somewhere between the green of pine trees and British racing cars, done in a starburst technique that both complements and contrasts with the case – to stunning effect. Moreover, it’s a solid gold fake Rolex, so it’s not exactly the most inconspicuous of timepieces. But why is this watch pretending to be something else? The green color amplifies the watch’s character without making it look over the top.  
Gold has fallen out of favor over the past few years, with red or pink gold being more fashionable. For many people, the brighter shades of this metal are too brash and garish. I think this is a short-term view. After all, red gold has been fashionable for the last 20 years or so. For the last 6,000 years, gold has been the king of precious metals. I think it’s safe to say that the luster of gold is not going to fade anytime soon.